Chandrayaan-3 Makes History: India’s Successful Landing on the Moon’s South Pole

In an unprecedented feat of engineering and determination, India’s Chandrayaan-3 has successfully landed on the moon’s south pole today at 6:00pm India time (1230 GMT). India has become the first nation to accomplish a landing on this unexplored region, marking a significant milestone for the country’s burgeoning space program.

Chandrayaan-3, which translates to “Mooncraft” in Sanskrit, embarked on its journey six weeks ago. Despite taking longer to reach the moon compared to the Apollo missions due to the use of less powerful rockets, the spacecraft has succeeded in its mission, overcoming a failed attempt in 2019.

Former Indian space chief K Sivan expressed confidence in the mission, highlighting that the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had made necessary corrections following the previous failure. “Chandrayaan-3 is going to go with more ruggedness,” he said. “We have confidence, and we expect that everything will go smoothly.”

The spacecraft’s lander, Vikram, named after the Sanskrit word for “valour,” has been sending back remarkable images of the moon’s surface since entering lunar orbit on August 5. Its success comes just days after Russia’s Luna-25 probe crash-landed, marking its first attempt in nearly 50 years.

India’s cost-efficient aerospace program, demonstrated by the modest budget of $74.6 million for Chandrayaan-3, continues to impress global experts. The success further emphasizes India’s reputation for frugal space engineering and stands as a testament to the skilled engineers behind the mission.

The landing on the relatively unmapped lunar south pole is expected to contribute significantly to scientific knowledge, as stated by Sivan. India’s space achievements have been growing steadily, with successful satellite missions to Mars and ambitious plans for a manned mission into Earth’s orbit next year.

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As the world celebrates India’s triumph, the Chandrayaan-3 mission serves as a beacon of inspiration for future space explorations and a shining example of what human innovation can achieve.

In an unprecedented feat of engineering and determination, India’s Chandrayaan-3 has successfully landed on the moon’s south pole today at 6:00pm India time (1230 GMT). India has become the first nation to accomplish a landing on this unexplored region, marking a significant milestone for the country’s burgeoning space program.

Chandrayaan-3, which translates to “Mooncraft” in Sanskrit, embarked on its journey six weeks ago. Despite taking longer to reach the moon compared to the Apollo missions due to the use of less powerful rockets, the spacecraft has succeeded in its mission, overcoming a failed attempt in 2019.

Former Indian space chief K Sivan expressed confidence in the mission, highlighting that the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had made necessary corrections following the previous failure. “Chandrayaan-3 is going to go with more ruggedness,” he said. “We have confidence, and we expect that everything will go smoothly.”

The spacecraft’s lander, Vikram, named after the Sanskrit word for “valour,” has been sending back remarkable images of the moon’s surface since entering lunar orbit on August 5. Its success comes just days after Russia’s Luna-25 probe crash-landed, marking its first attempt in nearly 50 years.

India’s cost-efficient aerospace program, demonstrated by the modest budget of $74.6 million for Chandrayaan-3, continues to impress global experts. The success further emphasizes India’s reputation for frugal space engineering and stands as a testament to the skilled engineers behind the mission.

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The landing on the relatively unmapped lunar south pole is expected to contribute significantly to scientific knowledge, as stated by Sivan. India’s space achievements have been growing steadily, with successful satellite missions to Mars and ambitious plans for a manned mission into Earth’s orbit next year.

As the world celebrates India’s triumph, the Chandrayaan-3 mission serves as a beacon of inspiration for future space explorations and a shining example of what human innovation can achieve.

MK Usmaan